White House Press Briefing on Immigration Suspension

Update: As of Monday night, 1/30/2017, Sally Yates, the acting Attorney General for the United States, has been fired by President Trump, for betrayal and insubordination.

Sean Spicer, the White House Press Secretary, provided more clarification today on President Trump’s suspension on immigration for 120 days that has been directed at Iraq, Iran, Syria, Somalia, Sudan, Libya, and Yemen. But, the Justice Department, headed by Obama-appointed Sally Yates (until Jeff Sessions is sworn into office), stated today that the Justice Department will not be making legal arguments to defend President Trump’s order.

“My responsibility is to ensure that the position of the Department of Justice is not only legally defensible, but is informed by our best view of what the law is after consideration of all the facts,” she said in a letter. “In addition, I am responsible for ensuring that the positions we take in court remain consistent with this institution’s solemn obligation to always seek justice and stand for what is right.” “At present, I am not convinced that the defense of the executive order is consistent with these responsibilities nor am I convinced that the executive order is lawful,” she wrote.

Here is the full White House Briefing and Sean Spicer:

The executive order only applies to Non-citizens. The Atlantic has published who is and who is not affected. Those affected:

For 120 days, the order bars the entry of any refugee who is awaiting resettlement in the U.S. It also prohibits all Syrian refugees from entering the U.S. until further notice. Additionally, it bans the citizens of seven majority-Muslim countries—Iraq, Iran, Syria, Somalia, Sudan, Libya, and Yemen—from entering the U.S. on any visa category.*

On Saturday this included individuals who are permanent residents of the U.S. (green-card holders) who were traveling overseas to visit family or for work—though a senior administration official said their applications would be considered on a case-by-case basis. The official also said green-card holders from those countries who are in the U.S. will have to meet with a consular officer before leaving the U.S.

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